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as we've been reporting all afternoon, jim. you saw the pictures coming out of the white house. defense secretary chuck hagel, cia director john brennan, talking about the situation in ukraine and discussing policy options. i should note, jim, that just outside the gates of the white house at this very moment there is a protest going on. some ukranians have gathered outside the north fence to talk about what they would like to see happen. they would like to see the u.s. get more involved. but as the hours go on, jim, i think we're going to get a clearer indication as to how this phone call went down between these two leaders. as you mentioned, they did speak a week ago friday. and you heard the president in the briefing room yesterday issuing that warning to vladimir putin that there would be costs if russia intervenes in ukraine. >> want to point out, jim, while those folks were meeting there in the white house for an emergency session in effect to discuss ukraine those pictures we just saw might explain that the president was on the phone with several world leaders including we now kn
, reporting from moscow, let's go to the white house right now, our senior white house correspondent jim acosta is standing by. jim, there were important meetings in the west wing of the white house, we saw the top national security advise scores leafing the west wing of the white house. i assume they'll be issuing a statement or someone will be going before the cameras, what are you hearing? >> reporter: and this is eerily similar to when the president was weighing whether to use military force against syria, there were some tense moments over here at the white house on some weekends as you will'll recall, wolf, and these principal meetings do occur from time to time. it does appear that one occurred this afternoon but the white house has to officially congrfi that mississippi t-- that that s the case. the chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey. so it does a appear that senior officials have been meeting with the president here about this situation in ukraine. and you know, wolf, you've been talking about options a that the white house has available to it, options that the preside
. what are you seeing there now? >> well here in the kentucky area, jim, as u nyou no as we s ice and the sleet and the snow coming into the area. i want to show you what is happening behind me here. the last live shot that we did. live report around 2:00 p.m. eastern. nothing was happening here. a little bit of rain coming down. and now the snow plows doing the work for the rest of the night. 173 pieces of equipment, they are starting to load up the salt to go out and make sure the roads are prepared. the timeline as we know it, i hear it will get rough as the hours go on around 9:00 p.m. we'll start to see the sleet and freezing rain here and then after midnight we'll see a lot of snow. the latest estimate could be five inches or more. so people are preparing as the system comes in. just like the locals. >> that is the way that you say it. >> also, in the cross hairs of the storm. tell me what you are seeing now. >> well, jim, everyone is prepares that they are going to see more. this city has seen five feet of snow. right now you will see it is drizzling here in philadelphia. b
for us here at cnn, jim sciutto. jim, what are your sources telling you tonight? i think we've got to emphasize, the white house hasn't said much about this and nobody expected the president of the united states to come out and make a statement about the ukraine. >> well, the white house hasn't said much but they were certainly worried about it and i've been hearing from a number of different parts of the government as their anxiety grew over the last 24 and 48 hours that something like this would happen. we've all seen the public statements from u.s. officials, from secretary kerry, secretary hagel warning russia not to do exactly what appears to have happened now in the ukraine and that is, send russian troops in. u.s. officials believe these are russia troops. over time, they are getting a better handle and the extent of the troops. this is a scenario that some had warned me about. the idea of tran it would be something more sought tell, special ops and black ops to get more cover and you see the russians getting legal cover here. the ambassador to the u.n. saying that the movem
". [cheers and applause] my name is jon stewart. my guest tonight jim demint a former senator from south carolina who left the senate to join a think thank because -- think tank because even just thinking around thinking in a tank -- [laughter] -- is more satisfied than being a united states senator. that's how bad it's gotten in the senate. not -- i will say this though, not that the senate is doing nothing. they did recently, i believe, pass the farm bill. >> the new farm bill president obama signed into law yesterday cuts $8.6 billion from food stamps during the next decades. >> >> jon: good. i think it's wasteel. who collects food stamps. the elvis' fat and skinny. you have your develop streeta zinni liberty bell. there no matter how valuable they may be they are just going to be bad -- oh, really food stamps are a form of assistance that allows those who are hungry to be less so. why would you cut that? lobbying from big stam stomach pang. >> using food stamps to buy ipads or cigarettes. >> you hear stories about people on food stamps going to vegas drawing money at casinos. >> jon:
back then and standing outside the hospital for days and the fight that jim has made for his life. and we see all of the victims, newtown and no matter how many victims there are of gun violence, there's such political resistance to closing loopholes. >> the encouraging thing that the american public is behind us. it's about closing that extraordinary disconnect that exists between what the american public wants and what the elected leaders are doing about it. we take tremendous inspiration from what sara and our predecessors at the brady campaign accomplished. this brady law has been tremendously effective. we've prevented 2.1 million prohibited purchasers from purchasing guns. that's 48 domestic abusers every day that have been prohibited. it's a question of building on that success and looking at what it takes to accomplish that success. it doesn't happen overnight and we can take inspiration from the fight that sara led around the original brady law there. >> i was covering congress at the time, i remember. >> we have to stay the course and it's about making the voice heard an
this rain and mountain snow so much. >> accu weather meteorologist jim dickey is tracking the pacific storm and another one hitting the northeast. good morning, jim. >> good morning, john and marci. we are tracking snow across the east into new england. through the early morning hours. it is weak but it will travel along the i-95 corridor. boston, south and west, new york city into d.c. just picking up a coating to an inch or show but leaving roadways slick. meanwhile, dealing with brutal cold along the upper midwest. northern plains minus 13, early morning low minneapolis. minus 3 in chicago. many spots above 0 during the day. soaking rain in california. we do need this but too much of a good thing will lead it flooding into the weekend. john and marci, back to you. >> jim dickey, thank you. >>> a spectacular scene from the surface of the sun. a giant solar flare erupted there yesterday. winds over 4 million miles per hour. flares often disrupt communications here on earth. this one was not directed at us. it could still cause auroras near the poles tonight. >> as the health care sign-up d
a russian military base there, as well as ethnic russians living in the region. let's go to nbc's jim maceda with the very latest on this. jim, let's get the latest. are we seeing something that could be another cold war brewing here between the u.s. and russia, ultimately? >> reporter: alex, well, the first sign things were going seriously south today was this morning when russian foreign minister sergei lavrov said that ukrainian power militaries actually attacked the ministry in crimea, wounding several people, presumably ethnic russians. despite there being no confirmation, no evidence of that, that alleged threat to russian compatriots in ukraine triggered a quick escalation, which russia has used many times before to justify an invasion. first the leader of ethnic russians in crimea called on president putin to send forces in to protect them from hostile extremists. then very quickly putin replied, requesting the use of force. and as you said in your lead, getting that request from force from the parliament. all that happening within just hours. now, that doesn't mean, alex, that putin
. >> that's the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff in an interview with nbc's jim miklashevski today while en route to afghanistan. that was them on the plane. general dempsey saying there he does not personally want u.s. troops to totally withdraw from afghanistan, but if there isn't a signed agreement between our government and the afghan government about u.s. troops staying on, then all u.s. forces will leave. this year. the chairman saying today that after 13 years of that war, u.s. troops accomplished their mission in afghanistan and it would not be a defeat to leave. something really specific seems to have led to today's big news about the war and the end of the war. this is defense secretary chuck hagel. this is him last october in brussels at nato headquarters. he was there meeting with all the other people who have his same job and all the other nato countries. it was the meeting of the nato defense ministers. at that meeting late last year, defense secretary chuck hagel told all the other defense secretaries in nato that by the next time they all got together, the u.s. and
approved that use of force. on the phone, we have chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim, what is this very quick vote signal to you? >> reporter: i think it's the russians slow rolling an invasion of sovereign ukrainian territory, and in direct defiance of repeated public and stern warnings from u.s. officials ranging from secretary kerry, secretary hagel right up to the top, right up to the president. you saw his comments yesterday. it is a sobering development. the fact is, u.s. officials were already telling us yesterday that those masked troops on the ground as of yesterday in and around crimea were russian so now you have a public in effect acknowledgment from the russian government that the president wants to send troops in there, this authorization. i think the other point is that you can see this as an intelligence failure by the u.s. officials had been telling us in the last 48, 72 hours that it was their assessment that the russians would not go in, and here you have it happening. it is not the way they did it in georgia in 2008. you remember when russia sent t
. craig? >> all right. nbc's ian williams for us there in ukraine, thank you. want to bring in nbc's jim mecada now. we heard from secretary of state kerry and samantha power and then the white house announcement on friday afternoon that warning that there would be costs. how's russia reacting to the criticism coming from this country? >> reporter: well, if russia is putin, they're reacting like the teflon man. first of all, the reason for that is that putin wouldn't call what he's doing an act of war or aggression with all due respect to secretary of state kerry, but more of an act of self defense from his point of view, from putin's point of view, the new western or pro-western government in kiev is posing an existential threat to crimea and it's an essential war mortar port and base for the black sea fleet and he doesn't seem a bit affect bd i the criticism from abroad. putin doesn't seem to -- he doesn't seem to believe that the u.s. or its allies have the leverage to hurt him, especially when he sees the kind of reaction coming from russians out in the streets here in moscow and st.
national security reporter jim sciutto is in washington. could this threat of seizing assets, could that deter the u.s. or eu from less viaing sanctions? >> reporter: it shows how quickly this could spiral into a tit for tat or unupmanship. right now they just target individuals, government officials involved in the decision to send troops into sovereign ukrainian territory. if the russians were to follow through on next step much seizing assets, you know, you have another option for the u.s. which has been discussed and brought up by republican senators, bob corker and others of sanctioning russian entities, meaning state banks, oil companies, energy companies, and that's when you start talking about real money. russia's trade, russia's very economy is dependent on access to the international finance system, its trade with europe. again europe lose as lot and that's why you're seeing opposition from the germans and british and others to more significant sanctions that have already been put on the table by the u.s. >> jim, educate our viewers. how common is it for a country that has
at the impact of the show and the man who held it all together and jim la lange as we remember him today. in honor of her late boyfriend and costar, we are hearing it for the first time. that's next. and it feels like your lifeate revolves around your symptoms, ask your gastroenterologist about humira adalimumab. humira has been proven to work for adults who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. in clinical studies, the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief, and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma, or other types of cancer, have happened. blood, liver and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure have occurred. before starting humira, your doctor should test you for tb. ask your doctor if you live in or have been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. tell your doctor if you have had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to in
of a power grab. chief national security correspondent jim sciutto joins us. despite these exercises, troops mobilizing on the border, the obama administration seems confident russia will not be moving troops into ukraine? >> reporter: that's the pentagon's assessment they're not going to act. what's changed in the last 24 hours, because the russians have moved these troops, mobilized these war planes, put them on alert as well, if president putin decided he did want to go in they could poomove so quick u.s. would not have a chance to react to it. that's increased the level of nervousness among administration officials. what would the u.s. do in reaction? we're talking really about only diplomatic means, protests, et cetera. because the supreme nato commander and american general breedlove says europe is not planning certainly any military reaction if the russians were to go in. >> it would be a huge deal if they went in obviously. the question is what would happen inside the ukraine. people there, the country dividing. what about putin? i know he spoke to president obama by phone last week.
in the ukraine may put more of a strain on the u.s. and russian relations. jim sciutto is joining us with that side of the story. so, in your mind, does the u.s. have any more plans other than just talking loudly at this point? >> well, that's a good question. in those words, there's a lot of meaning. officials delivering very stark warnings to the russians to be careful not to move in. you heard secretary of state john kerry saying yesterday it would be, in his words, a grave mistake in the russians move in. now you have defense secretary chuck hagel who is traveling saying that russia should not make any moves that could easily be misinterpreted. we know they are watching closely. i think we can assume that they are working very much behind the scenes to deliver that message as well. and that shows that they are concerned. what else can they do beyond those concerns, it's a fair question. we don't know. it's hard to say what else they can do. >> what is the biggest concern? >> the biggest concern is that russia moves in. we've seen this story before. you remember in 2008 when russi
's cup. >> welcome abrd. take your seats gentlemen, ladies. >> for 20 years jim van bleat has been a major figure in flotilla 1291 >> your title? >> i'm a commander. >> like many, he has prior military service. in the navy. and boy, he has some stories. he told me he got two purple hearts in vietnam. that is the ribbon at the top. in the middle with a gold star. >> i got tossed in the air by a mortar round like in the movies you go up, come back down on your head. >> two bronze stars. with a gold star and v, for valor. . >> i don't usually talk about my medals and actions i was in until after midnight. half bottle of tech keela. >> about those, a gold trident. given to navy s.e.a.l.s. van bleat told me he wen on s.e.a.l. patrols to provide coordinates for bombing runs and he carried out a secret s.e.a.l. mission into north korea after capturing u.s. intelligence ship the pueblo. >> very frightening. we thought we're going to be vaporized. >> his tall tales caught up to him by a new push by veterans to expose phonies. someone snapped this picture and posted it to fake warriors web s
said is really concerned. they want to iron it out in a united peaceful fashion. >> jim, talk a little bit about the concern from the perspective of the administration. russia is so key in so many discussions. you are talking about iran. you are talking about syria. so key and also such a thorn in the side of u.s. diplomacy in the u.s. reaching objectives. what does this mean for those other efforts? >> regional and global as you say. russia is central to any possible solution in syria. russia is central to the nuclear deal being negotiated and a difficult with iran. as the relationship runs into trouble over ukraine, the department said that russia is good at compartmentalizing these issues and can focus on one or the other. these are personal. there is a breech of trust here. also to jill's point. i think it's important. president obama lnchsed this. offering in effect an off-ramp saying you have your concerns in the eastern part of the country. let's address the concerns so that one, to remove that excuse if it needs an excuse to allow the troops to come in. also a face saving move.
, groups like the fellowship, family research council. describes senator jim inhofe, perhaps most anti gay politician, as sort of a mentor and hero. and he is has studied in the united states. these ideas are being sort of broadcast overseas and amplified and taken to a whole new level in uganda. >> inhofe, by the way, we checked with him. he says, you know, he's -- had nothing to do with this legislation. he rejects it. he says i certainly disagree with the controversial legislation that uganda may enact in the coming days. and as i've said before, it is my hope that the country will abandon this unjust and harsh legislation. similar statement coming from other evangelical groups saying it's one thing to be anti gay, if you will. but it's another thing to say that gay people should spend the rest of their lives in jail or even be executed for engaging in homosexual activity. so it seems to me, and correct me if i am wrong, that there may have been some inspiration. but what they're doing in uganda goes far beyond what some of these evangelical groups may have wanted. >> i think you're exa
a relatively long history with us too. it goes back to george h.w. bush and jim baker telling at the end of the cold war cheffard nazi and gorbachev that nato would go not one inch further to the east and then a series of presidents coming in who not only took nato further to the east, pushed by lock heed martin and others who wanted to sell weapons to eastern and central european countries, but hinted at georgia and ukraine. anyone who knows russian history, anyone who knows the history of empire, anyone who knows about the raw politics of raw power could have guessed that president putin would move into ukraine once we had formed a group there led by the n.e.d. and its affiliates that effectively pulled off a coup. put ourselves in putin's shoes. what is putin to think when all of a sudden a country that's been talking about bringing ukraine and even georgia into nato and into the e.u. suddenly affects the removal of his oligarchic leader in kiev. if i were putin, i'd have done exactly what putin did. anyone that says they couldn't predict this was either a fool or lying. >> well, that
this, but i believe jim mcgrechy appointed mr. samson to an important role at some point. >> david samson has friends on both sides of the aisle. that's certainly a part of the story. >> jim mcgreevey is a bipartisan sort of a guy. that said -- >> not the paragon of ethics in new jersey. >> i don't remember him being investigated by a legislative committee, though. come back to this idea of an ethical problem, this presents what we in the legislature like to call a marcy hochman moment, our legislative council. you do not do anything that even remotely ben you. if we're a part-time legislator, and we are, we cannot vote on a bill that will directly benefit one of our clients. i'm not going to comment on the particulars of those cases because i don't see all the facts, but until such time -- it just strikes me that, again, when you're in that position, your law firm is that closely related to it, there are certainly questions that need to be addressed. i'm sure that he will address them. >> given what had his law firm does and what the port authority does, there's the overlap seems
was at most of the hearing but left for a bheegt the astronaut jim lovell. in the end senators don't care about people suffering from alsz. 5 million americans suffer from alzheimer's disease, 15 million americans care for them. >>> you can bet more than one political operative will be awaiting a dock drop at the clinton presidential library. more than 4,000 pages of confidential documents will be made public later today and everybody is wondering whether anything juicy will be revealed. the last time those private papers were released they showed hillary clinton called monica lieu withincy a narcissistic looney tune. mark preston is cnn's political director. good morning, mark. >> reporter: good morning. >> any hints for us? >> reporter: it's interesting, we'll see about between 4,000 and 5,000 documents that will be released today. we expect 33,000 documents released over the next month so there's got to be something in there that will cause some interest. i mean this is all during the time when president clinton was president. we know that his wife was one of his top political advisors
died. jim lang was with the show. it included michael jackson, farrah faucet. he was 81 years old. >>> coming to a freezer near you. prepare yourself for fourny flavors of benefit & jerry's ice cream. all but the salted caramel have two ice cream flavors on either side of the core. >> i like that. >>. >> i'm thinking about what we should be having for breakfast. let's not talk about the nutrition of that please. what we are going to talk about, nutrition labels. breaking this morning, nutrition labels are in for a major overhaul. the fda is proposing changes for the first time in over two decades. >>> the goal is to help americans understand what they're buying so they can eat healthier. let's bring in dr. sanjay gupta for more on this. i want to get your opinion on if you think it's going to help people eat healthier in a second. first start me off with the changes. >> it's a perfect segment from benefit & jerryss. this is interesting. people may not know, before 1990 food nutrition labels were not required. it was voluntary. they want to make this sort of more relevant to people
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)